New Lambda variant of Covid-19 found in UK, more dangerous than Delta variant

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently raised concerns about lambda variants. On 14 June, WHO gave information about this new and seventh variant of Covid.

New Lambda variant of Covid-19 found in UK, more dangerous than Delta variant

While the delta and delta plus variants of Kovid-19 remain the reason for the increase in infections worldwide. At the same time, with the arrival of another new variant, the concern has increased further. Now the 'lambda variant' is being said to be a new emerging threat. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently expressed concern about the lambda variant. On 14 June, WHO gave information about this new and seventh variant of Kovid. The WHO reported that "lambda is associated with community transmission in many countries and may see an increase in the number of cases of COVID-19 with increasing prevalence over time."

According to Malaysia's health ministry, the lambda version of the coronavirus is turning out to be deadlier than the delta, which was first detected in India. It said cases of the lambda variant have been detected in more than 30 countries in the past four weeks.

Where was the lambda variant first discovered?

Lambda variants were first detected in Peru. This is where the lambda variant is believed to have originated and is responsible for about 80% of infections there. This was found in cases as early as December 2020. Several cases of this variant have also been reported in neighboring Chile, but until recently, it was found only in a handful of South American countries, including Argentina. The UK said that it has found this variant in 6 infected people. Recently, it has also been found in Australia.

How is the Lambda variant different from other variants?

According to the WHO, there are now 11 official SARS-CoV-2 variants. All SARS-CoV-2 variants are distinguished from each other by mutations in their spike proteins. These are the components of the virus that allow it to invade human cells.

The WHO stated that, "Lambda contains a number of mutations with suspected phenotypic effects, such as increased transmissibility or potential resistance to neutralizing antibodies".

However, still not much is known about the Lambda variant.

"There is limited evidence of an effect associated with these genomic changes, and more robust studies into phenotype effects are needed to better understand the effect on cloning and control spread," WHO said in a statement. "Further studies are also needed to validate the continued effectiveness of the vaccines against these variants."