People fleeing Afghanistan by selling what they made over the years

The people want to run away from the country by selling their furnishings at throwaway prices.

People fleeing Afghanistan by selling what they made over the years
The people want to run away from the country

After the Taliban's occupation of Afghanistan, the people want to run away from the country by selling their furnishings at throwaway prices. People are selling household items in the markets for everyday items and food. Ever since the Taliban took power in Afghanistan, the despair and desperation of Afghans trying to flee the country has been increasing. Afghans are trying to flee the country at all costs for fear of a hardline Taliban in the war-torn country. With the advent of the Taliban, the people are facing serious economic and social problems. In such a situation, in the markets of the capital Kabul, people have been selling pairs of goods at low prices for years. He is just hoping to earn some money from it to help him escape the country or buy food for himself and his family members.

Serious economic problems With the capture of Kabul on August 15, the Taliban took control of the whole of Afghanistan. With the arrival of the Taliban, serious anarchy has spread in Afghan society. There is no employment for the local people or employment opportunities are shrinking. Afghans currently cannot withdraw more than $200 per week from their bank account. This means that there is a huge cash crunch in Afghanistan. Mohammad Ahsan, a resident of a hill town in Kabul, has come to sell two blankets from his house in Kabul's market. They say, "We have nothing to eat.

We are very poor, we are forced to sell these things.” Ehsan says that rich people used to live in Kabul, but now all have fled the country. Ehsan used to work in the construction sector, but the construction work is suspended or else Plates, glasses, glassware, kitchen utensils, and other items are strewn on temporary tables in this market in Kabul. Old sewing machines, carpets, and other items are also sold here by carrying them on their shoulders or carts. See: New rules for women in Afghanistan don't trust Taliban ordinary Afghan Mohammad Ahsan is one of countless Afghans who have seen successive changes and hardships in their country. Ahsan and other Afghans are wary of the Taliban's claims of peace and prosperity. Such claims were made more frequently during the last Taliban regime, from 1996 to 2001.

"You can't trust any of them," says Ahsan. Another businessman Mustafa says he is using his 'shipping container' as a shop. He told the news agency that many of the people from whom he had bought goods were on their way to the border hoping to leave the country. Mustafa says, “Earlier we used to buy goods from one or two houses in a week, if you have the space to store things, you can buy 30 household items at a time. People are helpless and poor,” says Mustafa. People are being forced to sell goods worth 6 thousand dollars for two thousand dollars. Afghanistan is already reeling under drought and food shortage and the COVID-19 pandemic has added to the hardships of the people. Due to Corona, the condition of the public health service of the country has become even more frightening.