New variant of Corona surfaced

The formal name of this new variant is B.1.1.

New variant of Corona surfaced
New variant of Corona surfaced

Concerns are rising about a new variant of the coronavirus first found in South Africa. There are many mutations in this variant and due to these, there can be major changes in the way the virus works. The formal name of this new variant is B.1.1. South Africa's National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) has confirmed 22 cases so far.

The institute has also said that genomic analysis is underway and that more cases may come to the fore. The World Health Organization has classified this variant as a "supervised variant". The organization has said that its earliest samples were found in November in many countries. Maria Van Karkhove, head of the organization's COVID-19 technical team, said the variant was detected in South Africa and there are currently fewer than 100 whole-genome sequences available. More information is needed Now it will take a few more weeks to find out more about it and then a decision can be taken whether to declare it "Variant of Interest" or "Variant of Concern" only after that it will be given a Greek-like Delta Names can also be given. Van Karkhove believed that this variant has a large number of mutations and because of this, the behavior of this virus can change.

But it is not yet clear what this means for the efficacy of existing vaccines and drugs. "Whoever is out there needs to understand that the more this virus spreads, the more it has a chance to mutate and the more mutations will emerge," says Karkhov. Cases of new variants are also reported in Botswana and Hong Kong. . Across Africa, only 6.6 percent of the population is fully vaccinated, and the fourth wave of the pandemic is spreading in many countries. Steps taken by many countries John Kengasong of the African Union's Africa Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stressed that the data that is coming out will be investigated and evaluated. "We still need to do more studies, there is still a lot we don't know about this virus," he said.